thomasmullersabae

dwarvenqueen:

-

 

featherymischief:

angelshizuka:

Brother Bear Appreciation Week

Day 3: Favourite Quotes

LET ME TELL YOU WHY THIS IS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT, UNDERRATED DISNEY FILMS OF ALL TIME OKAY:

1. It teaches kids that we should never judge others by their appearance or what we’ve seen on the surface.

2. It teaches kids that despite if we’ve been taught to be afraid of or hate something or someone that looks/acts differently than us, we should learn and try to understand them before we judge them.

3. It teaches that two sides that may hate each other don’t always have to stay that way - they can learn and grown from each other’s mistakes.

4. It teaches that hatred is not always the answer; to listen, to step back, and see through someone else’s eyes. It teaches patience, understanding, and wisdom.

5. IT TEACHES CHILDREN THAT PEOPLE CAN BE FORGIVEN AND DO BETTER.

6. It teaches children that even if you make a mistake, you can learn and grow from it like Kenai.

Seriously I just love this movie to pieces it is so important to me and I wish more people knew/watched it because wtf it’s AMAZING.

NOT TO MENTION THE ENTIRE CAST IS POC AND CULTURE WISE IT IS RESPECTFUL AND IT IS JUST A GREAT MOVIE OKAY

tiny-tiny-tiger

charlie-in-a-beanie:

dutchnorkat:

skankmcmeow:

I see your shifting gaze, that disgusted glance. I know you’re questioning my parenting from across the elementary school assembly.

Let me tell you a little story about the kindergarten student with bright purple hair, my little Raven Marie…

A month before school started she decided to play hair stylist with the craft scissors, and to save what was left I had to opt for a pixie cut. She was absolutely devastated. It was about three hours before she stopped her harsh sobbing and hiccups.

Why?

She has thought that the length of a girls hair was what made her “girly”. I know I’ve personally had many hairstyles around her before, including a purple mohawk, which many people criticized as not being “girly” enough. Media, other children, other parents, and society made it worse. She would randomly burst in tears while out in public for the first week of her new style, screaming that she looked like a boy. That everyone would think she’s a boy.

At one point she took off her bow in her hair, threw it at a cashier and screamed, “I DON’T NEED THIS BOW TO TELL YOU THAT I’M NOT A BOY, BECAUSE I’M NOT”

Proudly stomping away in her blue jean overalls, head held high.

Once we edged closer to the first day of school she kept asking questions like, “Do you think the other kids will like me? Do you think they’ll be my friend? Will they think I’m a boy? Will they pick on me because I have boy hair?”

So I went to the grocery store, bought some dye, and spent the whole night transforming my bright blonde little girl into a plum punk rock fairy. I then assured her that if any of the kids didn’t like her, they were just jealous.

As for you, mothers and teachers with the wandering eyes filled with disgust and judgement, I’m in the business of raising a free spirit.

Here’s to you, Raven Marie. I love you.

SHE’S THE CUTEST OHMAHGOD CAN I HUG HER

I want that hair

miroslav-kloses

But I love the football that brings people together across religious divides, geographic divides, political divides. I love the fact that for ninety minutes in a rectangular piece of grass, people can forget, hopefully, whatever might be going on in their life and rejoice in this communal celebration of humanity. The biggest diverse, invasive or pervasive culture that human kind knows is football and I love the fact that, at the altar of football, human kind can come worship and celebrate. x